Lime Cordiale
Credit: Jack Shepherd
ICON: When you began your music career from 2009, you’ve said that you didn’t really know what you were doing. What was one of the biggest lessons you’ve carried since then?

Lime Cordiale: “There have been some good quotes. One producer we worked with years and years ago, said you just have to do what you think sounds good. If you think it sounds good, then it sounds good. Confident enough to only do what we felt sounded good to us, instead of trying to find what other people liked… it doesn’t need to fit into a genre.”

You possess this very cool 70’s look and your sound is quite laidback, how did that come about, was it just something that grew naturally or did you have an idea when you started making music that you wanted to head in that kind of direction with your look and your sound?

LC: “In terms of look, Salvos is a great place to find clothes.

“That’s definitely a secret, I didn’t think Louis was going to reveal that to anyone.”

Vinnies and Salvos is definitely where we get our clothes from.”

Lime Cordiale
Credit: Supplied

I think being brothers as well, we’ve both grow up with the same music from our parents which is very helpful… we would all listen to The Beatles and David Bowie.  A lot of world music. Our Dad is a documentary filmmaker and he’s made a whole bunch of films on music around the world. So, we had eclectic stuff, whether that’s from Brazil or Africa or Papa New Guinea it was always these different cultures coming out of the speakers. But I think we always have loved older and vintage sounds. The 60’s, 70’s and 80’s sounds but then trying to do something new with that is what we are interested in now. Using our inspiration from that time and how can we use that tastefully with modern techniques in the studio to make that tasteful instead of using modern techniques to make hectic electronic music. [We] try to keep those vintage roots in there.”

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And how would you say the industry has evolved in the past 10 years – since the beginning of your music career?

LC: “The huge one is Spotify. When we started as a band, Spotify didn’t exist. How we developed as related artists on Spotify, we would go out there and do the groundwork with live shows and play as much as possible and then somehow the algorithms worked and we started to show up when people were listening to whatever music, [for example] Jungle Giants, we would show up.

People that like Tash Sultana and Ocean Alley saw those guys play shows, and when we did our Europe tour last year, a lot of those people said, ‘We found you on Spotify because of these related artists we like.’ That really worked in our favour and it wasn’t to do with radio plays, we didn’t feel like any of that European audience was to do with radio plays. It markets you without you having to try. You’re just doing the things you need to do like playing live music.”

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Speaking of live music, you guys are known for doing hundreds of shows, what has it been like in lockdown? Obviously the arts industry has been hit quite hard.

LC: “We cancelled our world tour. Three American tours and one Europe tour because we had to. A lot of people have had it worse. For us, we’re not at the stage where we are making heaps of money in Europe and America so it’s not like we lost a lot of money there but I think if you were a band that was just starting to blow up and you had to cancel your whole Australian tour, that would be pretty horrible. But we’ve decided not to push back the album release, we just wanted to keep that rolling. We’ve just been writing; we were down south last week doing a writing trip as we want the next album to come pretty soon after this one.”

Your next album ’14 Steps To A Better You’ is a parody on a self-help book. What makes your album better than those books?

“I think we have better advice than Anthony Robbins and probably better exercise routines than Jane Fonda.”

LC:  “We are as contradictory and hypocritical as any of these self-help guys are. But our last album, the main message in there was you should do whatever you want and don’t listen to anyone else. You don’t have to take the same steps as everyone around you and all your peers might be telling you what you need to do. This album is that same message but at the same time don’t be a waste, make sure that you’re adding some positivity to the world. You can do whatever the hell you want but make a positive impact.”

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What was the pressure like to back up your highly successful debut album with a second major release?

LC: “We’re not really thinking about it that much. We just want to get it out there. The last album was a slow burner, we released that. We did three Australian tours before it felt like people were catching on to that album, it wasn’t like something that really smashed into the atmosphere when that was released. I think this one is just exciting. We’ve released quite a few songs from it already and we’ve got more and then the ones that aren’t singles so we are excited to release. Parts of our song writing haven’t really been exposed yet.”

Lime Cordiale album

You garnered 4 hits in the top 40 of the hottest 100 this year. Did you expect this kind of success?

LC: “Not at all. There’s a bit of pressure on that because the year before we had one song come in at number 89 and that was really unexpected. We had no idea that would happen. So that was a major surprise, then when the next year came around people asked, “Where do you reckon, you’ll place this year?” That’s what scared me because people are asking you. We knew we had four songs in the running, but we didn’t think that all four would get in there, let alone that highly played as well. It was a very nice surprise for sure.”

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What is the first thing you want to do when restrictions are lifted?

LC: “Just playing shows and travelling again at home and over to New Zealand. We’re not too concerned if we can only tour in Australia and New Zealand for now. You realise how insane and amazing it is and what an incredible feeling it is to play shows and play music with other people, it’s really great and we appreciate it. ”

Lime Cordiale’s new album ’14 Steps To A Better You’ will drop on July 10. For more from the bother duo, visit their website here.

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