Swiss watchmaking brand Tudor (and sibling of Rolex) has divided the watch community with the unveiling of its all new ‘Ranger‘ collection. It’s a modern update to the classic Ranger collection thanks to its appeasing 39mm wide, 12mm-thick, steel case, yet stripped-down in a way that ultimately pays homage to the vintage Tudor Rangers of the 1960s.

The tool-first, fashion-later watch ultimately celebrates the spirit of the tool watch, which, in the case of the Ranger collection, honours 70 years of daring adventure and the tradition of expedition. This watch is unequivocally an expedition-appropriate watch. Born from the Oyster Prince watches used by members of the British North Greenland Expedition – a British-led scientific mission which lasted from July 1952 to August 1954 – these timepieces were harnessed for the robust, practical and reliable features the time-only instrument provided throughout the expedition.

The new Tudor Ranger carries on this tradition and spirit, and really, is a no-frills tool watch. It doesn’t feature a date complication, it offers easy to read Arabic numerals at 3, 6, 9 and  12 o’clock, a practical screw-down crown and modernised with an in-house manufacture calibre MT5402 movement.

On the movement, the Manufacture Calibre MT5402 has been designed to ensure robustness, longevity, reliability and precision due to its variable-inertia balance, which is held in place by a sturdy traversing bridge with two points of fixation. Thanks to this balance and the non-magnetic silicon balance spring, the Manufacture Calibre MT5402 has been certified as a chronometer by the Official Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC). Thanks to this exceptional movement, you can also expect around 70 hours of power reserve.

The new Ranger incorporates other state-of-the-art technical elements, in particular a Tudor “T-fit” clasp with rapid adjustment system. The dial offers a detail of historic influence, with the hour markers beige in colour and painted in luminescent material. The arrow shaped hands, rounded for the hours hand and angular for the seconds hand, are characteristic of traditional Ranger aesthetics. The tip of the seconds hand dipped in burgundy is a welcomed modern touch. 

It comes with the choice of a traditional steel bracelet, hybrid leather and rubber strap, and a fabric strap, all inspired by the tradition of expedition.

Beyond its historical influences, the Tudor Ranger also takes clear inspiration from the iconic Rolex Explorer 1016 – a grail of many sorts to many different watchmakers. This is where the debate comes in: is the Tudor Ranger too much of an Explorer try-hard? Is the Ranger lacking originality? Or is it just a little dull? These are very real and justified questions posed by watch pundits, with the split between love/hate sitting in the middle.

Personally, I think it’s a great addition to the modern Tudor portfolio. My only gripe is that I would have loved to have seen it in a 36mm option.

What are your thoughts on the new #TudorRanger?

 

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thoughts?