Billie Eilish
Credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for KROQ/Entercom

Billie Eilish is one of the most successful young artists of our time. Not only is she a multi-Grammy award winner, she has written the next James Bond theme song – surely another award winner – and boasts 63.2 million followers on Instagram. But since her sharp rise to fame, the internet couldn’t help but body shame the 18-year-old. This week, she has slammed haters in a powerful short film dubbed, Not My Responsibility. The video was first teased during the Where Do We Go? world tour. Now, we’ve been given the project in full.

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Written and produced by Eilish, the ‘bad guy’ artist is seen against a dark background where she strips down from her usual clothing of choice  – oversized hoodies and shorts – before submerging in a pool of black water.

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“Some people hate what I wear, some people praise it. Some people use it to shame others, some people use it to shame me. But I feel you watching, always. And nothing I do goes unseen,” Eilish narrates. “If I wear what is comfortable, I am not a woman. If I shed the layers, I’m a slut. Though you’ve never seen my body, you still judge it and judge me for it.”

“Would you like me to be smaller? Weaker? Softer? Taller? Would you like me to be quiet? Do my shoulders provoke you? Does my chest? Am I my stomach? My hips? The body I was born with, is it not what you wanted?

This isn’t the first time Billie Eilish has slammed body shamers. During an interview with Pharrell Williams for V Magazine, she condemned people for commenting on the way she chooses to dress.

I wear baggy s–t and I wear what I want; I don’t say, ‘Oh, I am going to wear baggy clothes because it’s baggy clothes.’ It’s never like that,” she explained. “It’s more, just, I wear what I want to wear. But of course, everyone sees it as, ‘She’s saying no to being sexualized,’ and, ‘She’s saying no to being the stereotypical female.’ It’s a weird thing because I know a lot of what I hear is a positive or people trying to be positive about how I dress; how I am never really out there wearing nothing, or wearing dresses. I’ve heard that. [Even] from my parents, [the] positive [comments] about how I dress have this slut-shaming element. Like, ‘I am so glad that you are dressing like a boy, so that other girls can dress like boys, so that they aren’t sluts.’ That’s basically what it sounds like to me. And I can’t [overstate how] strongly I do not appreciate that, at all.”

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thoughts?