The evolution of Seth Rogen
Seth Rogen during “Knocked Up” Los Angeles Premiere – Red Carpet at Mann’s Village Theater in Westwood, California, United States. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic, Inc for Variety Magazine)

For a generation of film lovers, the evolution of Seth Rogen has been nothing short of spectacular to watch. In 2007’s Knocked Up, his breakout role introduced us to the Seth Rogen we would all come to know and love. The lovable screw-up, a weed-enthusiast whose best intentions are undercut by the worst laid plans.

But now the weed-aficionado is upping the ante, making the transition from stoner comic to ganjapreneur. Following the hallowed footsteps of Jay Z, who recently released his own luxury marijuana line Monogram, Seth Rogen has entered the weed game with Houseplant.

A company that has been a decade long passion project, Houseplant represents the latest joint (ahem) venture between Rogen and Evan Goldberg. The pair have been long time collaborators on numerous films, but Houseplant represents their first foray into the business world.

 

Already an established weed brand in Canada, Houseplant will launch in America from Thursday, March 11, promising “high-quality cannabis and design-led, innovative home goods to the U.S. market.”

The launch follows the brand’s 2019 entry into the Canadian cannabis market, where Houseplant quickly became one of the country’s most sought-after brands.

The evolution of Seth Rogen
CREDIT: HOUSEPLANT

But aside from proving that Rogen’s passion for weed extends beyond only smoking it, the launch of Houseplant is the latest chapter in the evolution of Seth Rogen.

Knock, Knock, Knocked Up

In 2007 there was a high (ahem) chance that if you were going to the movies, you would see Knocked Up. Directed by Judd Apatow and starring Rogen alongside Katherine Heigl (very 2007) and Paul Rudd (timeless), Knocked Up was a surprise hit.

The incredible success of Knocked Up – it banked over $200 million at the box office – put into motion a career trajectory that would serve Rogen well. A glut of similar-but-different enough films followed: Superbad, Pineapple Express, This Is The End.

Rogen had established himself as the premier stoner comic of his generation, a man whose punchlines were served sharply through a haze of marijuana smoke.

The evolution of Seth Rogen
Katherine Heigl, Seth Rogen, Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann and Judd Apatow, director/writer/producer (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic, Inc for Variety Magazine)

Depending on how far back your Seth-curiosity goes, you may have fallen under his spell in the early days, at the turn of the millennium. A curly-haired young Rogen played Ken Miller in Freaks and Geeks, a woefully underappreciated show that since gone on to develop cult status.

Freaks and Geeks was a little bit of a star factory; the cast, including James Franco, Linda Cardellini, Jason Segel, and Busy Phillips.

The evolution of Seth Rogen
The cast of “Freaks And Geeks.” From l-r: James Franco (as Daniel), Linda Cardellini (as Lindsay Weir, front, green jacket), Seth Rogen (as Ken Miller, plaid shirt), John Daley (as Sam Weir, front blue striped shirt), Martin Starr (as Bill Havenchuck, back wearing glasses) and Samm Levine (as Neal, far right). Photo credit: Chris Haston NBC, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

But it was Rogen who stole the limelight, imbuing Ken’s character with the wonderfully-relatable everyman status that would become a hallmark of his career.

High Times in Hollywood

After Knocked Up cemented Rogen’s status as a leading man, he continued his prolific-albeit-predictable run of hit films. There was the occasional misstep, the less said about Green Lantern, the better, but for the most part, Rogen has proven himself to be three things. Profitable, hilarious, and high.

Alongside Willie Nelson, Woody Harrelson and Snoop Dogg, Rogen became the stoner-celeb that Hollywood embraced. The more he embraced the weed culture, the more his career blossomed, peaking in 2017 when he produced and starred in The Disaster Artist.

the evolution of seth rogen
LOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 15: Rapper Snoop Dogg (L) and television personality James Corden attend Hilarity for Charity’s 5th Annual Los Angeles Variety Show: Seth Rogen’s Halloween at Hollywood Palladium on October 15, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Randy Shropshire/Getty Images)

The film was nominated for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy at the 75th Golden Globe Awards. However, despite how much Hollywood likes to pat itself on the back for being progressive, there is still an element of hesitation in embracing leading men and women who don’t fit the mould.

Seth Rogen may have made it, but with his curly mop of hair and dadbod, topped off by a permanent stoner’s grin, there was still an element of outsider-looking-in.

No Such Thing as A Lazy Stoner

Undoubtedly, Rogen’s personality is unphased by how others view him, yet it’s hard not to feel the evolution of Seth Rogen seems like the work of a man on a mission.

Houseplant’s arrival represents a decision by Rogen to wholly lean into his passion for weed culture, flipping the stereotype of a lazy stoner on its head and turning his interest into a business. Meanwhile, Rogen also spent much of last year’s lockdown finishing his first book, “Yearbook,” which Penguin Random House will publish in May.

When he’s not feverishly writing or working with the Houseplant team, Rogen has become somewhat of Ted Cruz Twitter troll, celebrated online for his ongoing war with the Texan senator.

The pair have clashed frequently over the last few months, the exchanges revealing a more politicised side to Rogen then we’ve seen in the past.

This is reflected in the mission statement released by Houseplant earlier this week, which states, “As leaders in cannabis, we also have an obligation to build an industry that commits to changing everything that’s been wrong about cannabis. We are aware of the racial injustices that exist and will work closely with other industry leaders, legal teams, politicians and non-profits to help those unjustly incarcerated.”

It seems the evolution of Seth Rogen is only just getting started, and it’s high time we celebrated him for it.

thoughts?